Eurasia

Why War Fails

Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine and the Limits of Military Power On February 27, a few days after Russia invaded Ukraine, Russian forces launched an operation to seize the Chornobaivka airfield near Kherson on the Black Sea coast. Kherson was the first Ukrainian city the Russians managed to occupy, and since …

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The End of Laissez-Faire: Russia’s Attempt at Reshaping the World Economy

Starting on May 31, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov embarked on a tour to Gulf Cooperation Council countries, where he visited Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, among others. Lavrov’s main objective of these visits is to strengthen ties between Russia and GCC nations amid a global race for geopolitical …

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Turkey’s Assault on Syrian Kurds: a Secondary Crises of the Ukraine War?

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is producing secondary crises. Some are well publicised, such as the threat to world food supplies because the war has prevented Ukraine exporting millions of tons of grain from its Black Sea ports. The exodus of Ukrainian refugees crammed onto trains as they sought refuge …

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«Можно говорить об очередном повышении ставок»

Дмитрий Дризе — о новых сценариях развития ситуации на Украине Встреча президентов России и Украины Владимира Путина и Владимира Зеленского не отвергается, заявил помощник российского лидера Юрий Ушаков. Однако, по его словам, подобное мероприятие требует тщательной подготовки. Комментируя тему переговоров с Киевом, Ушаков отметил, что российские предложения от 15 апреля …

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The Middle East Isn’t Toeing the U.S. Line on the War in Ukraine

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has brought some clarity to regional realignments and strategic partnerships in the Middle East, with the changing relationship between the United States and the oil-producing members of the Gulf Cooperation Council in particular coming into sharp focus. War has a tendency to cause states to …

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What We’ve Already Learned From the Russia-Ukraine Crisis

For several months now, much of the U.S. and European foreign and security policy community’s attention has been riveted to the Russia-Ukraine border, where more than 100,000 Russian troops remain massed and equipped for a potential invasion. Most of the internal debates in the West during this time have focused …

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The U.S.-China Competition Comes to the Pacific Islands

With the first visit in four decades by a U.S. secretary of state to Fiji and plans to open an embassy in the Solomon Islands reportedly in the works, Washington officially announced its “return” to the Pacific Islands this past weekend. “It is about building a free and open Indo-Pacific, …

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The West Should Stay Focused on Geoeconomic Rivalry With China

As China leveraged its state capitalist model to become a global superpower, it increasingly challenged the market-oriented basis of the liberal economic order founded by the United States and its allies 75 years ago. When this competition between the Chinese and Western economic systems gained steam in the 2010s, the …

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Biden Should Think Big on the U.S.-EU Trade Agenda

When U.S. President Joe Biden participates in his first summit between the United States and the European Union tomorrow in Brussels, he should keep the focus on the big picture. While easing bilateral irritants would improve the tone of relations in the short term, the real test will be whether …

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