Greece wants from Germany to cut off arms supplies to Turkey

Author : Mircea Birca | Friday, October 23, 2020
Posted in category Balkans, Eurasia, Middle Orient, Turkey
Comments Off on Greece wants from Germany to cut off arms supplies to Turkey

Against the background of military conflicts in the Middle East, Asia and Africa, quiet political-military diplomacy is being conducted on the European continent at the request of Greece.

The Greek side has sent a letter asking Berlin to suspend all supplies of weapons and military equipment to Ankara due to the conflict between the two countries [Greece and Turkey] in the Mediterranean and the gas fields there.

Christopher Burger, a spokesman for the German Foreign Ministry, said in an open interview that such a letter was indeed sent from Athens, but assured reporters that such issues are taken after an individual decision, after a process of research and analysis of the situation, and issues related to German foreign policy. He also told reporters that their request for more detailed information about the content of the letter was impossible because it was confidential.

According to the German spokesman, Berlin is following with great attention and concern what is happening in the Mediterranean, and that so far Berlin has not issued new permits for the export of weapons or critical weapons in the direction of Ankara, which weapons in one way or another affect events in the Balkans.

Greece is trying to influence the decisions of other EU members, especially by attacking a deal between Berlin and Ankara for the production of six submarines to be delivered to the Turks in mid-2027. This letter sent from Athens to Berlin is not the only one. Political analysts claim that Greece has sent similar letters to all members of the European Union.

Canada has already cut off some military technology supplies to Turkey

Apparently reports from the war zone led to a much stricter reaction to the Canadian government than to the NATO Secretary General, who officially left it at the non-binding statement that a military solution was not the right one. Canada’s Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne announced, however, that the export of Canadian drone technology (optical systems, laser systems for target recognition) to Turkey will be suspended. Canadian-made sensors are built into the Turkish TB2 Bayraktar drones, which can monitor processes on the ground even in bad weather and at night, reports CBC.ca.

In the last few days he had heard of allegations that drones with Canadian technology were being used in the war in Nagorno-Karabakh, according to Foreign Minister Champagne. Therefore, in accordance with Canadian export regulations, he is exposing them to the current hostilities. The situation will be examined further.

The Turkish Foreign Ministry reacted angrily and accused Canada of double standards, since the country also exports weapons that are used in the Yemen War, delivered to nations that, unlike Turkey, are not a NATO member. The senior representative of the Turkish arms industry indicated that one could get by without the technology from Canada, since the company’s own weapons development was making progress.

Turkish support for the government in Baku is also shared by the opposition party CHP: “The hearts of 83 million Turks beat for Azerbaijan,” said Kemal Kilicdaroglu. Apart from the HDP, Erdogan’s military policy apparently has no domestic opponents. As long as he keeps Russia busy on the various fronts, NATO will not object to his war policy either.

While Erdogan has engaged Russia on various military fronts, NATO has no problems with Turkey

NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg was in Turkey this month; There is no shortage of conflicts in which the NATO member is significantly involved: Syria, the eastern Mediterranean, Libya and now Nagorno-Karabakh – Turkish war equipment, soldiers and mercenaries are involved everywhere, who aggressively promote the national interest with acts of war or how in the case of the dispute in the eastern Mediterranean, with the threat of military action to enforce or want to enforce it.

Since Turkey is on the other side of Russia with its military policy in Syria, Libya and its support for Azerbaijan, it was not to be expected that Stoltenberg would parade the Erdogan government – even if NATO member France has been doing this for months was requested.

It was important to Stoltenberg to document the agreement within NATO, probably also with a view to Russia. This message was highlighted by the government-affiliated Turkish newspaper al-Sabah-Daily:

“The NATO allies have decided to increase their support for Turkey. Secretary General Stoltenberg said that Ankara’s security is synonymous with the security of the alliance.”

This is followed by a sentence that is difficult to reconcile with reality, for example in Syria and Libya: “Praising Turkey’s role in the fight against terrorism, Stoltenberg said that the country played an important role in the fight against terrorism has.”

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